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Tourism officials urge visitors to respect NH resources

With a busy summer tourist season, New Hampshire officials are urging visitors to respect the area’s resources. Summer is the busiest time of year for tourism in the Granite State, and this year should be no exception. Preparations were underway Thursday at the Purity Spring Resort in Madison. Spring Resort, King Pine Ski Area and Danforth Bay Camping and RV Resort. seasons in New Hampshire,” said Taylor Caswell, commissioner of the Department of Business and Economic Affairs. Visits and expenses have increased significantly since summer 2020 when most things were closed due to COVID-19. But as the state continues to see growing crowds, officials are urging visitors to follow the rules. “It’s really important for people to realize that we really depend on a natural asset, and its ability to provide the beauty and the outdoor activities that people really come here for,” Caswell said. Mike Henriques has hiked trails in New Hampshire for most of his life. “I think it’s really important if you pack something you pack it in,” Henriques said. He said that It’s important for outsiders to follow ‘leave no trace’ guidelines. what we can to take care of it,” he said. Part of the “leave no trace” advice includes picking up litter, putting down what you find, and being respectful of wildlife.

With a busy summer tourist season expected, New Hampshire officials are urging visitors to respect the area’s resources.

Summer is the busiest time of year for tourism in the Granite State, and this year should be no exception. Preparations were underway Thursday at the Purity Spring Resort in Madison.

“In terms of tourist numbers as we look ahead to Memorial Day weekend and then this summer even further, we’re looking really good,” said Thomas Prindle, director of marketing for Purity Spring Resort, the estate. King Pine Ski Area and Danforth Bay Camping and RV Resort.

Prindle said Purity Spring is almost at 70% capacity this weekend and Dartmouth Bay is well booked.

“We’re coming off of a pretty big streak of record-breaking seasons in New Hampshire,” said Taylor Caswell, commissioner of the Department of Business and Economic Affairs.

Visits and expenses have increased significantly since summer 2020 when most things were closed due to COVID-19. But as the state continues to see growing crowds, authorities are urging visitors to follow the rules.

“It’s really important for people to realize that we really depend on a natural asset, and its ability to provide the beauty and outdoor activities that people really come here for is not endless,” Caswell said.

Mike Henriques has hiked New Hampshire trails for most of his life.

“I think it’s super important if you wrap something you wrap it in,” Henriques said.

He said it was important that outsiders adhere to the “leave no trace” guidelines.

“Look, if we’re all going to use this phenomenal wilderness, we all have to step up and do what we can to take care of it,” he said.

Part of the “leave no trace” advice includes picking up litter, putting down what you find, and being respectful of wildlife.